Project Oasis: The Split Plotline

Sep 23, 2014 by

oasis_by_arthurblue-d41dm8t

Thanks to ArthurBlue for letting me use this amazing picture. Click pic for link.

Before writing sometimes it’s good to have a plan. But what about when you don’t even know what direction you want the story to go and you don’t know your character well enough yet?

I found this technique while listening to different songs that I thought might fit what I wanted my new character to be. On one hand it worked because each song gave me story ideas; but on the other hand the ideas were conflicting with each other. Kelly Clarkson’s Since You’ve Been Gone gave me ideas for a Shadra (the character) with more attitude, while Idina Menzel’s Let it Go gave ideas for a Shadra who tends to keep things inside.

So I took all the ideas and wrote my plotline like this:

-In Ariibii Shadra is careless and does whatever she wants but feels like everyone’s being restrictive
-After the destruction of Ariibii she’s captured, she’s constantly livid and constantly looking for an escape
-After escaping she doesn’t know what to do with herself
-She meets a girl who helps her decide to make a fresh start at life
-She decides to start over as the complete opposite of the way she was before

Either:

-She wanders off, trying to find purpose
-She’s captured by GUN and caged, reverting to her angry self
-Plot point I don’t want to spoil
-Seriously I’ve spoiled enough
-Another plot point
-Conclusion!

Or:

-Her true self gets harder and harder to control and constantly suppressing it turns her darker
-Same here, no more spoiling
-Plot point
-I think you get the idea
-You got a plot point!
-Conclusion!

Figure up a few different ways it could go depending on possible differences in the character and write them down; then as you write and see how the character grows no matter what that is you’ll have a goal. Make sure you pay attention to the character progression and that you put it in your outline (notice how I said when she feels careless or angry), that will help you figure out which plotline you’ve ended up on.

Also, writing the different possible plots out could let you see which you like best before you even start; telling you which progression you’ll want to steer the character towards.

1 Comment

  1. A cool byproduct of this method is that you can use the alternate plot and character personality somewhere else.

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